So now you can pay for mods on steam


#1

…anyone think this might be a greater incentive for developers to release modding tools and use mods as a source of income?

So imagine Evolve having mod support, people could make skins and sell them for a price which is cool, as it results in Evolve having a modding community and hopefully like Skyrim, the option for free mods is still there.


#2

Well Evolve is a multiplayer only (we don’t talk about bots here) and there are no dedicated servers, so steam workshop would be out of the question.


#3

Someone beat you to it

But the reason evolve doesn’t have mods is because they don’t own the engine


#4

Evolve uses dedicated servers.


#5

I mean private dedicated servers.
I don’t know if you can host a LAN server ingame, but I’m very certain you have not released a dedicated server tool.


#6

Why would steam workshop be out of the question if mods where only client side (like L4D 2)?

Yeah mods would help sustain the playerbase, maybe attract a few more people. But right now the price is the biggest problem. Evolve needs to go F2P or a huge sale if it wants to be huge. The summer sale should help with that.

I still think F2P would be the way to go.


#7

Is there a list somewhere with all the available dedicated servers?
Like, if anyone of Central Europe hosts (be he from France, Denmark or Portugal, anywhere), will it select the same servers or are there actually multiple server locations in CET?


#8

Because unlike L4D2, this is a HideAndSeek themed game where mods like “Hotrod pink Goliath” would not be so amusing for both sides.


#9

To be honest, it’s not that different from the cosmic skin. On the wraith it’s pretty bright, then again, it looks more cosmic and cooler on the wraith than the other monsters as a result.


#10

I always wanted mods for Evolve, Then realised that i have a PS4 so i’m not getting mods anyway xD


#11

You’d be surprised, mods are possible on a console it’s just that publishers would rather sell you DLC and there is proof of mods on consoles.

Unreal Tournament III came to the PS3 and Xbox 360 in addition to the PC. On the PS3 mod support was allowed, when someone made a mod on PC they can “cook” the mod to make it work on the PS3 also. Through an in game menu you were able to access new weapons, maps, characters etc

It got pretty funny in some ways also, look at this link:

Through mods you were able to play as Master Chief on your PS3. So, what happened? Why did only Unreal Tournament III have mods? Well, around this time, Call of Duty was becoming really big, the sole map pack of Call of Duty 4 did really well while UT3 with free content did poorly. What did this tell publishers? Give DLC and not mods. And there you have a prime example of gamers voting with their wallet and why in the long run we should be worried about what we do to gaming and not SJWs or politicians.


#12

It’s very different!
A hunter that have installed a mod that make the monster glow bright is still cheating!
You can’t defend it by saying that some of the skins the monster can choose to pick is easy to spot.


#13

i think that this would be a good thing . . . if valve didnt take 75% of the PROFIT. . . . its a evil attempt to money grab nothing more and anyone that says “but steam is hosting it” doesn’t understand how a fair split works. steam gets only a percentage of like 20% of sales of games on its store. so why does it suddenly get to have 75% of ANY mod. and by the way its a “give us 75% or WHATEVER you sell it for or you cant sell it period” type of deal. even if its a pay what you want circumstance valve will still get 75 percent of it. so no matter what happens the modder is getting screwed.

the amount fo effort some people put into modes IE skyrims mods is INSANE. yet they only get 25% of money payed for there work? when valve literally does FUCK ALL other then host it?

sure im all for modders being supported by being paid but the moment they are getting unfairly shafted is the moment where i say fuck it


#14

You know 25% is actually quite generous, right? I assume that some of the 75% also go to the game devs.
Look at greenlight, Valve only demand 50%. Valve could easly have gotten away with a worse deal, considering the have monopoly on PC gaming.


#15

if part of that 75% goes to the developer then yes that is also more reasonable. but 75% going only to valve is unreasonable. maybe more clarification on that from valve would help


#16

A simple fix would be that mods only affect the team you are playing on your client. Seems like it would fix any issues with regards to visibility.


#17

…You guys know this got canned, right?

Let’s face it, it’s not like Valve lacks foresight.

They asked the community “Whadda you guys like?”

We said “Not this” and they’re just like “A’ight.”


#18

I don’t think it’s going to be an incentive at all really.

It’s already been released that modders only get 25% of the revenue of the mods they put up. A LOT of time can go into making a mod, and most of the time people share it as a point of enjoyment to the game/title. If you’re going to make them professionally, 25% means you’re going to make it cost a lot to cover your losses, or just get a slap in the face with every sale. Also, the creater of the mods does not get to remove their content from steam if it ends up being illegal or otherwise problematic. There’s some great forum posts about it.

I for one hope that it encourages people to make great mods… But people were creating great mods before steam… But I don’t think the developer get’s any kick-back for modders making anything for their game except for the continued interest in their title (which means nothing unless they use DLC)

There has already been some problems with mods going up that aren’t useful, or even abusive. Some of my favorite were “trash mod” which literally, adds usable trash barrels to the game… or “Almost nothing” mod… which adds almost nothing to the game. Steam isn’t planning on monitoring the usefulness of the mods in steam… So buyer beware.


#19

This was more or less a test to see if it would benefit the community by bringing in incentive for more people to create content for games. While they meant well, within the first hour ~20 mods for Skyrim were already made paid. The most heinous was a follower re-skin, the price of which was set at “pick your price” anywhere from $5-$500, how they thought they could sell a texture for that price, idk.

At the very beginning Valve said they would can it if the community didn’t like it, and surprise surprise, people don’t like when free stuff starts costing money. I’m just glad that Valve is willing to admit to a mistake and fix things.