I want to semi convert to PC. Who wants to help? Post your PC Specs and Advice please!

#1

I have an Xbox One and despite its many (many) pitfalls, I love it. I don’t plan on getting rid of it.

I do want a gaming PC though. For the indie exclusives and Evolve and games that will be on PS4 and PC like Street Fighter 5. But I need help! I am hoping to hear from people who play Evolve on High to Ultra (if there is an ultra setting) and people who have used PC part picker. And in general people who want to share their specs!

So anyone want to help and give advice?

Edit: Include what you spent on your build if you don’t mind.

#2

CPU: Core i7 4770k @ 4.5GHZ
Motherboard: ASUS Z87 Plus
Memory: GSkill TridentX 32GB DDR3 2400
GPU: ASUS GTX980 Strix w/ Asus 750Ti Strix as dedicated Physx
PSU: Rosewill CAPSTONE 1000W 80Plus Gold
SSD: Samsung EVO 850 250GB
HDD: Western Digital 1TB black w/ 64GB Crucial SSD Cache Drive.
Monitor: ASUS VG248QE Black 24" 144Hz 1ms

I run everything on Max @1080p with ~100fps

1 Like
#3

Holy cow! How much did that cost?

#4

You don’t need to go all out- I can play Evolve on Low settings which still looks better than the Xbox One and get 60FPS. I use a cheap laptop. Dell something or other.

#5

Somewhere around 2 grand I believe. Like @MidnightRoses said tho you don’t have to go all out

#6

Here is a true whole sale website my father uses for his it business
Evertek.com

Otherwise newegg.com is the most common website used

#7

I build my rig 2 years ago for 1300euros (including ssd’s and monitors) and right now im playing evolve maxed out with 40 to 70 fps.

So for today standarts if you are making a full pc including monitor+ mouse keyboard etc etc a good one would be at 1000$.Ofc you can always build a rig with lower price,like 600-800 but my advice would be spend 1000$ so you can enjoy all current games maxed out plus the ones that will come down the road.

#8

How is that even possible? lol

#9

People will help you, but you need to specify so many things, like for example. Do you need a monitor? do you need mouse and keyboard how about Windows? New parts? Used? for when? and of course, the most important part - the budget.

Oh and location. US, EU… prices vary so much…

@WiBaKi has a point, if you need everything it’s about 1k… People skip on monitor a lot of times, don’t.
You can get good 24’ monitor with 144 Hz refresh rate for $150. People underestimate it in their builds because “who cares” but it makes a difference in your enjoyment.

#10

A good monitor, a comfortable mouse, keyboard and headset/speakers DO contribute significantly to gaming pleasure indeed.

A few things to consider regarding this.

You CAN start with dirt-cheap mouse/keyboard/speakers for a month or two if you need to spread your expenses a bit, but once you’ve tried a decent gaming mouse, you’ll get addicted to it.

It makes less sense to start with a cheap monitor as it will still cost some money, unless you plan to use it for dual screen later on.

Bigger screens (bigger resolutions) will eat up resources fast. If you plan to go for 27+ inch monitors, you may have to ramp up your GPU a bit.

#11

My advice is this:

PC gaming is expensive, don’t believe these £/$500 dollar PC myths. It’s a premium product, what you are getting is the best gaming experience where you can remaster games free of charge in the options menu, you got backwards compatibility and games sometimes have the modding community behind them, go check out Skyrim.

You have to remember a console like an XBox One or a Playstation 4 are quite simple, they just run games, they don’t have anything as complex as Windows running in the background which takes a lot of resources. For example, Assassin’s Creed Black Flag on the PS3 is using 1GB of memory, the MINIMUM on PC is 2GB. So what this means is that while you can theoretically build a gaming PC that matches console specs for cheap, you need to account for the fact that in a year or two it will need further upgrading because it is a much more complex piece of kit that has a whole lot more going on.

My point? Remember this is a premium product, I’m not telling you to go get Titan X and a 4K monitor and buy a computer that costs thousands but just that you can’t go to the other extreme and go cheap either.

My build:

Carbide Air 540 case - £120
MSI Z97 Motherboard (A motherboard with the Z97 chip means it is compatible with the next 5th generation Intel CPUs) - £150
Fan controller (I got six fans, a motherboard does rarely has enough connection ports, especially if you got a CPU cooler so you get a fan controller) - £28
Corsair low volume fans x 6 - £50
Corsair 750w PSU (Power supply unit, 750w is great if you are not planning to go SLI but still want to make sure you can easily power a machine) - £40
i5 CPU K series (Can’t remember the exact number, but the K series will allow you to easily overclock if you want) - £150
Corsair CPU cooler (Great for overclocking) - £50
MSI 750 Ti (Budget purchase, still decent but not amazing) - £110
Windows 7 - Can’t remember the price, if you want you can just get Linux for free but not all games are compatible.
2TB HDD - £50
Corsair 8GB RAM - £80

Total: £828, NOT INCLUDING Windows, I can’t remember that.

I recycled a DVD Drive and monitor, also purchased a Razer Orbweaver which is a great keyboard replacement and an XBone controller which is great for laid back couch gaming.

#12

You mean 4K? Are there many 27 inch 4K monitors already? I don’t know US prices but I’d say a 27 inch 4K monitor is on the expensive side for any budget, and I’d dare say that the majority of monitors will be 1080p anyway. Unless you refer to 1080 as a high resolution.

#13

The GTX 980 uses DSR technology, it means even on a 1080p 22 inch monitor you can do 4k gaming, no 4K monitor required.

http://www.geforce.co.uk/hardware/technology/dsr/technology

#14

Ahhh right, I’ve read about is. I guess that with a really high end card this is worth it. For everyone else I guess that with 1080 is mroe than ok :slight_smile: Especially coming from consoles where it’s a luxury.

#15

There really is no need to go all out on your PC, but when you do it’s like you’re two generations ahead of the consoles.

On Evolve, everything maxed out at 1080p my PC averages 110 fps.

Case: Cooler Master HAF 932
PSU: Corsair HX1050
Motherboard: ASUS X99 Deluxe
CPU: Intel Core i7-5930K @ 4.36 GHz 1.300V
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011
RAM: 4x G-Skill Ripjaws DDR4-3000 4GB
GPU: Gigabyte Geforce GTX 980 G1 Gaming
Display: ASUS VG248QE
Sound card: ASUS Xonar D2X
Main Storage: 1x Samsung 850 Pro 512 GB, SSD for Windows, apps and games
Data Storage: 2x Western Digital Caviar Black 2 TB, 7200 RPM
      + 1x Western Digital My Book 1 TB external
      + 1x Western Digital Velociraptor 300 GB, 10000 RPM for backup copy of the OS in case the SSD fails

Keyboard: Logitech G710+
Mouse: Razer Lachesis 5600
Mouse Pad: Steelseries QcK Mini
Headphone: Audio-Technica ATH-M50S
Microphone: Blue Yeti Silver

The cost for a PC like this in Brazil is obscene. People call me crazy; I don’t give a damn.

#16

Yup, got a DSR card and a 27" but, in all fairness, it’s not exactly worth it. Just something to mention on the side.

#17

My setup was about $800 when I built it 2 years ago and will easily squeeze another 3 years out of it. You can certainly do it for a lot cheaper now. Click each part for an Amazon link. Some of these parts aren’t available new so I linked to a comparable part. Remember to cross check prices with places like Newegg.com since they often have some things cheaper or have sales.

CPU: i5 4670K @ 4.0GHz (stock 3.4GHz)
Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO
Mobo: Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H (Can’t get this new anymore. Link to newer version.)
RAM: 8GB (4GBx2) G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3 1600
Graphics: MSI GTX N760 2GB Twin Frozr (factory overclocked. Link to comparable card)
PSU: Corsair TX Series 650W
SSDs: Samsung Evo 850 250GB
HDD: Western Digital 1TB black
Case: Cooler Master HAF922 (I ordered enough case fans to fill it to capacity. It’s still ultra quiet.)
Monitor: Given to me by a friend. Just a simple 24" 60Hz monitor similar to this one.

Some of this stuff is slightly more expensive because it’s old stock. If you look for newer parts for some of these you’ll get a better part for cheaper.

I run on High @1080p with 50-60FPS. You can get a solid 60FPS at medium settings. I don’t mind (or notice) the slight loss of FPS.

#18

I’d love a 27 inch monitor, of course, heh. But probably just if it’s 4k.
For now I think I depend on having more than one monitor, so I rather rock a 3 monitor setup.

#19

It is a very subjective topic. You have to set yourself a price range and then work from there otherwise you will never buy the thing looking at prices all the time.

Myself I went all out on the thing and got what I could. Bare in mind its almost 2 years old now!

CPU: I5 4670K
Mobo: MSI G45
RAM: 16 GB Avexir MSI dragon RAM (Oh how I love your flashy red LEDs XD)
GPU: EVGA GTX 780ti superclocked with stock cooler
PSU: Corsair AX860
SSD: Sandisk 256GB pro
HDD: Western Digital Blue 1TB
Case: Cooler Master Trooper
I currently use a Sony TV as a monitor which is bad considering I have the 780ti. Saving heavily for a G sync which is absolutely heavenly tech!
Mouse: Razer Mamba (Dont recommend)
Keyboard: Logitech G510s
I have a Sony soundbar for speakers (Very good quality audio for about £90)
And I also have a Razer Kraken 7.1 Headset

Total ive spent is around £2500 reason being is ive upgraded various bits after buying the originals already. So I had 8GB corsair RAM and a terrible corsair PSU before.

Like I say however its important you decide what you want it to do… Do you want it to be the best of the best and completely ruin the console quality?! or would you rather it just performed well at above console quality but nothing flashy?! Or are you even happy with console standard?!

I would recommend starting small get decent keyboard and mouse so as to not put you off straight away with the change of format and go from there.
If you would rather I would even recommend buy it and use your current Xbox 1 controller to play evolve on PC until you can get the hang of keyboard set up!

Seems like there is a lot of people here who know PCs so you can always ask for help!

And ALWAYS build it yourself!!!

P.S Dont even contemplate 4k at the moment! Its still massively in its infancy and the price to visual gain is very very bad at this current time!

#20

So you don’t actually need a lot of fancy stuff to make an ok computer. Stuff like a solid state drive or certain gpu’s don’t actually add that much. What you do want is a decent motherboard, some sort of i5 processor (processor speed doesn’t really matter a lot in gaming so unless you also wanna be able to do something really computation heavy don’t bother with a really fancy processor), 8 gb of ram although if you can afford 16 gb that’s better (only reason to not get 16 is if you can’t really afford it), a big hard drive (like 1tb), a case that can hold all your parts and will allow efficient cooling, a power supply, and a decent gpu.

The thing that is gonna improve your graphics and game performance the most of any part is your gpu and the fancier the gpu is the longer it will last you. The gpu is the thing you should invest the most in since its basically the most important part. The differences between the higher end gpu’s though can be quite small even though their price differences can be quite large. I used to have an nvidia gtx 760 and I replaced it with a gtx 970 and evolve looks a little bit better but it isn’t a huge difference graphically. When it comes to the gpu you want a nice one but you also want the cheapest one that will do the job you want it to just as well as the most expensive one. What I mean is evolve will look just as good on a gtx 980 as on one of the nvidia titan cards except the gtx 980 is around $650-$700 and the titans are pretty much all over $1000. If you want to run evolve at max graphics, 60 fps the 980 will do it just as well as the titan but for a lot less money.

There is other stuff about the gpu to consider also. I was going to buy the gtx 980 but then went with the 970 instead because really the only differences between the 970 and the 980 are the 980 can run stuff in 4k and the 970 can’t and the 970 has a problem with it’s ram but is also only around $300. My monitor isn’t capable of 4k resolution and the 970’s ram problem (massive performance loss if a game draws more than 3.5 gb of visual ram) can be avoided by not running at crazy resolutions (somewhere way above 1080p) and not using crazy anti aliasing either. Realistically if you’re running a game in 1080p and using the built in anti aliasing, current games won’t ever draw over 3.5 gb of vram so there won’t be any issues. If your monitor can’t support 4k the 970 is probably going to do just as good of a job as the 980 but for $300 less. I run evolve with max graphics at 60 fps and since my screen doesn’t do 4k the 970 was a good choice because I would have just been wasting the 4k capability of the 980. Basically you want a nice balance between cost and performance with the gpu. It’s easier if you have a specific goal in mind like running evolve at max graphics and 60 fps because then all you need to do is figure out which cards can do that. After that you can decide how long you want the card to last and what the advantages of the different cards are.

I talked about an i5 and nvidia cards but there’s also the AMD stuff which I’ve never used and don’t know a ton about. What I do know is Intel chips (processors) generally work better with nvidia (I’m not even sure you can use nvidia with an AMD processor) and the Intel chips are always more expensive but the really high end ones have significantly better performance than their AMD counterparts. As far as AMD Radeon (their gpu brand) vs nvidia I don’t really know the difference. I kind of assume it’s the same sort of trend where the really high end nvidia stuff is better than the AMD Radeon equivalents but that’s just an assumption.

Something that is sort of optional but really nice to have is better fans and upgraded heat sinks. It’s not super expensive to upgrade the cooling on the parts and it makes a noticeable difference. Water cooling is really great but it’s also a huge pain to set up and if you screw up while you’re setting it up you can destroy all of your parts. In most cases it isn’t worth the effort and should probably only be set up by someone who has experience setting it up. In my computer I just have a bunch of fans (upgraded) and my gpu is only 28 C after 5 hours of evolve. Air cooling works fine and is cheap and easy.

The power supply is pretty mundane but also surprisingly important. A power supply is basically a transformer and the different models are all rated and designed for different power outputs. A cpu and gpu both use a lot of power and if you have extra fans there is going to be an even larger power drain. It may sound a little insane but you probably want a 1000 watt power supply. I don’t know if you’re going to actually use all of those 1000 watts but if you don’t have enough power your computer simply won’t work and if you have too much there isn’t a drawback aside from the price of the supply. I only have a 625 watt supply because my computer is a pre built thing I’ve upgraded and when I put my new gpu in I was really worried I wasn’t going to have enough power. The gtx 970 uses around 150 watts, my processor uses another 100 roughly so right away I only have 375 watts left. My fans probably use quite a bit and then after that there’s all the other random things that draw power. If I wanted to put another 970 into my computer I would probably have to buy a new power supply (and a new case since the 970 is pretty big).

For the case you want it to hold all the things you want to put in. That’s kinda all there is to it. A big one can hold more fans and parts but costs more and is also physically bigger so it takes up more space.

Something that is totally optional but nice to have is a wireless card. You can always buy a little usb adapter for a lot less but a built in wireless card tends to work a little better.

Random peripherals you’ll want and need are a mouse, keyboard, screen, some sort of sound system, and maybe a mic. The mouse and keyboard are probably the least important parts. A cheap mouse works basically as well as an expensive one but won’t have a million buttons on it and might not be as comfortable or as reliable and certainly won’t last as long. I have a razer naga. I bought it for WoW since it’s got a ton of buttons. I used to have to get a new mouse like once a year but I’ve had my naga for 3 years now and it’s still working just as well. Being able to keybind the abilities/weapons in evolve to your mouse is neat but most of it’s functionality is wasted. The keyboard is pretty similar to the mouse in that a cheap one works but is gonna break sooner and won’t do any tricks. For your sound I recommend a reasonably priced headset with some sort of surround sound in it. I used to buy cheap headsets but after the 3rd one with bad audio quality and bad mic quality that quickly broke I finally decided to spend more than $10 and bought a $50 one. It’s ok. I think I should have spent a little more and gotten 7 channel surround. Surround sound in evolve is a huge advantage and a built in mic is bonus so the headset is worth spending a little more on. The screen is probably your most important peripheral and a good one will be expensive. With the addition of Slim’s spore grenade having a big monitor suddenly matters a lot since trying to find a tiny hunter on a 19" screen is a lot harder than on a 27" screen (granted it still isn’t easy). I would bet you can get a decently sized 1080p monitor for a reasonable amount of money though. My screen is 1080p, 27" and has touch so it was really expensive but touch is totally optional. For most people there isn’t a reason to have it. I do a lot of math so being able to write on the screen is useful but in a purely gaming pc a touch screen is like an appendix.

That’s about all the advice I can offer. Basically I would just try and make a computer that does what you want it to do without being fantastically expensive which really isn’t that hard. A lot of the stuff that makes high end gaming pc’s expensive are parts that are more powerful than what you need. My friend recently built a computer for about $1000 that I think runs evolve at max quality and 60 fps (I don’t think it’s in 4k though). That might be the cheapest you can do if you want max quality and 60 fps but maybe cheaper is possible. The price difference between a console and a pc is absolutely worth it.

If you want your computer to be able to do more than game (internet browsing doesn’t count) the cost might go up really fast. If you want it to run CAD software an i5 processor might not work anymore and you may need an i7 with a high clockspeed since CAD is pretty calculation heavy. With CAD the faster your processor cycles the more calculations it can do in a second and the less time you’ll have to wait for your computer to finish whatever it’s doing. If you wanna do a lot of video editing you’ll again need a fast processor but you’ll probably want a second hard drive and maybe even more than 16 gb of ram. Games don’t usually really push hardware but other types of programs will so if you want to do those other things you gotta take that into consideration.