2014! the year of netcode!


#1

Seriously though what is with the netcoding these days???

why cant major publishers nail the networking and matchmaking down on day one launches??!? evolve was an alpha that is expected, not the ps4 stuff but the other issues. but HALO, TITANFALL, COD ADVANCED WARFARE, AC:UNITY. cmon man! that is ridiculous that a single major multiplayer title cant get it right. actually besides the cyber attacks on destiny at least their system actually worked. people wonder why riot and valve are thriving so hard on f2p models? paying full price then headaches for dayz/weeks until the network is right will effectively cut half of your playerbase at least until it is fixed, some dont come back at all.

I hope 2015 can be amazing for all games. evolve in particular of course :blush: but dam I really hope this isnt a trend for years to come. nothing worse than seeing anticipated games fall on their face because no one can play it simply from servers/networks not working. otherwise like this year in my opinion. it will be the year of RPG’s (shadowfall has not been beaten for game of the year to me. maybe dragon age? maybe smash bros will take the crown).


#2

Why pay for time and effort when people will still buy your ground up pile of fecal matter? (Not talking about Evolve of course) People are content with mediocrity, and until people stop voting with their wallet it will stay that way for a good long while. There were a few big multiplayer games that had great lunches. But they are the minority because big companies just don’t care.


#3

yeah the problem with that though is people have already bought or preordered it and it comes out like that. then you have 2 choices nowadays. sell it for 10$ less. or wait out the storm and play when it finally works. if you demand a refund through all the delays theyd proly have it fixed anyways. and gamestop wont return new games :frowning: not sure for other places tho


#4

But if a multi million dollar game came out with 0 sales because people stop pre-ordering without facts/reviews etc… Things would change REALLY fast. However, I feel that support for those types of games gets so much headway due to herd/sheep mentality. The problem is, the ones making the decisions aren’t having their wallets hit hard enough :frowning:


#5

that would never happen haha. cuz of pre-order incentives and die hard fans. for example how many of us did not care how bad the matchmaking and netcoding was for evolves alpha? some ppl waited 4-5 hours just to get 1 session in. some people turned it off and never went back. but we die hards would do anything to play it.

plus id imagine if a AAA game has numbers projecting 0 pre-orders and lots of media saying they will not buy until it is released with a proven working system. the company would a) delay the game. or b) hire a shitton of reviewers and youtubers to prove the coding works.


#6

I agree that it won’t happen, which is why it won’t really change :frowning: It’s an unfortunate system. Same with why Hollowood produces so many piles of bullcrap that makes millions of dollars and prevents good movies from coming to light.


#7

It doesn’t matter how big the test is, there’s no test as big as release. So there are some problems you will never find until you release the game. Unlike the rest of the game, networking and matchmaking several million people isn’t something you can test until you have several million people pounding on the game.


#8

So what you’re saying, is that you need several million people to be in the next Alpha/Beta :smiley:


#9

maybe we should do pre-releases? it comes with the prewarning that this is highly likely to fail? ah nah thats practically the same as releasing normally. this is not a complaint thread I really want everyone to do well on launch day and everyone has been struggling hard.

what about…fake ip tests? not sure if there is a way. but itd be sort of troubleshooting the servers by creating temporary ips to flood the server and make sure the server can handle it.

the only other option i can possibly think of is when beta goes live…you leave it live like dota and league of legends did. constantly updating and slowly inviting players in. this way they get the disclaimer that 1) their progress WILL be wiped launch day. 2) issues will arise and be fixed for launch day.
a normal beta does work for the most part but dota and league going live was basically non existant. dota went to open beta and anyone could try it out/ play. then the day it went f2p on official launch. most people had played alot of it. of course its harder when you gotta pay 60$…full pre-orderers get the access?

so many problems to tackle.


#10

There’s no magic bullet. If you simulate a million people logging in, you’re not testing a million people logging in, you’re testing your simulation code.


#11

A lot of companies, this is their first test of a big, live game. Or it’s their first test on the new consoles with new network architecture. Once they have one game like that under their belt, the next one will be easier.


#12

im fresh out of ideas haha.

come with a massive warning in the advertisements lol.
“first few days may be wonky”

I will be there every step of the way. if ps4 repeats or not. I will not move until i get in a match hahaha its totally worth the agony of waiting once you are in. I trust you guys and sony wont lowball you like they did for the alpha again hopefully.

wish there was a way though. not for evolve only. just for AAA games sake. people get very angry.


#13

I can imagine it’s nerve-wrecking for the developers. People have unrealistic views on how long it should take to properly patch a bug. (I have friends who think sites like eBay can be coded in a week, and should cost about $10,000 to make)

I tell them "There’s a reason why software developers, from application languages to C++ to front-end languages like JavaScript, are pulling in $80k+ a year, and it’s not cause they’re accepting bids on projects for $200 and “your favorite pizza and beer”.


#14

Once a game is live, patching it is hard. The plane is full of passengers, at 30,000 feet. You can’t just shut down the engines and replace them. You have to find a way to fix the plane in midair.


#15

Then I propose another big test for Evolve for PC and I offer myself as sacrifice to this cause.

Kappa.

No, but seriously a beta for PC would be super cool. :slight_smile:


#16

So THAT’s why you’re a Writer. I’m gonna have to use that analogy. I’ve had so many instances where mgmt wanted changes made in production, I protested, but was overruled… and… well… bad stuff happened.


#17

As @Matthew already pointed out none of the devs are familiar enough with the new architectures or engines. This coupled with most Q/A teams getting less and less time and attention thru the last few years makes for catastrophic releases. It doesnt matter how many internal tests the game gets, 1hr post release is more playtime cumulative than a dev-team could ever hope to achieve.
Luckily were seeing this slowly change, at least for some publishers.

I remember back when the working conditions of devs seemed savage (EA spouse story anyone ?). At least this seems to have changed for the better (and still is) and it looks like the focus slowly goes away from release-at-all-cost-crunch-crunch-crunch to a more consumer-oriented release (make no mistake, theyll still get their money via other means).

Nowadays theres CTE versions/servers for a lot of big new games to ensure the games quality lives up to expectations and a company that brings a broken launch simply wont be able to keep up in the long run if they dont change stuff quickly (not in consumer terms, im talking about realistic timeframes)

Most of the times problems arent as appearent (or easy to fix) to the consumerbase as they might seem, and with every dev-blogpost about issues youll read a whole new world of understanding might open up to you.
Sure, its easy to blame “netcode” but unless a dev or someone working in that field explains to you what it actually means and how it works, everyone’s just running around guesstimating solutions for problems they dont properly know.